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Obama joins Japanese PM in historic Pearl Harbor visit

Obama joins Japanese PM in historic Pearl Harbor visit

Putting 75 years of resentment behind them, the leaders of the United States and Japan have come together for a historic pilgrimage to Pearl Harbor, where a devastating surprise attack sent the U.S. marching into the Second World War.

Ahead of a visit to the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Barack Obama had a formal meeting at Camp H.M. Smith, a Marine Corps installation and headquarters of the U.S. Pacific Command.

Obama and Abe sat next to each other in front of Japanese and American flags, with white flowers in between them and translators at their sides.

They shook hands but made no remarks as reporters were allowed in briefly for the start of their meeting. It’s expected to be Obama’s last formal meeting with another world leader before he leaves office next month.

US Japan Obama Pearl Harbor

President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe had a bilateral meeting at Camp H.M. Smith in Hawaii on Tuesday. (Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press)

Later Tuesday, Abe will become the first Japanese Prime Minister to visit the USS Arizona Memorial, and the first Japanese leader to visit Pearl Harbor with an American president.

Abe’s visit with Obama is powerful proof that the former enemies have transcended the recriminatory impulses that weighed down relations after the war, Japan’s government has said. Although Japanese leaders have visited Pearl Harbor before, Abe will be the first to visit the memorial constructed on the hallowed waters above the sunken USS Arizona.

It’s also an act of symbolic reciprocity, coming six months after Obama became the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima in Japan, where the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb in hopes of ending the war it entered after Pearl Harbor.

“This visit, and the president’s visit to Hiroshima earlier this year, would not have been possible eight years ago,” said Daniel Kritenbrink, Obama’s top Asia adviser in the White House. “That we are here today is the result of years of efforts at all levels of our government and societies, which has allowed us to jointly and directly deal with even the most sensitive aspects of our shared history.”

More than 2,300 Americans died on Dec. 7, 1941, when more than 300 Japanese fighter planes and bombers attacked. More than 1,000 others were wounded. In the ensuing years, the U.S. incarcerated roughly 120,000 Japanese-Americans in internment camps before dropping atomic bombs in 1945 that killed some 140,000 people in Hiroshima and 70,000 in Nagasaki.

Abe will not apologize for Pearl Harbor, his government has said. Nor did Obama apologize at Hiroshima in May, a visit that he and Abe used to emphasize their elusive aspirations for a nuclear-free future.

‘War is war’

No apology is needed, said 96-year-old Alfred Rodrigues, a U.S. navy veteran who survived what one-time U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt called a “date which will live in infamy.”

“War is war,” Rodrigues said as he looked at old photos of his military service. “They were doing what they were supposed to do, and we were doing what we were supposed to do.”

United States Japan Pearl Harbor

Pearl Harbor survivor Al Rodrigues, 96, says he welcomes the visit by Japan’s top leader to the USS Arizona Memorial that honours sailors and marines killed at Pearl Harbor. (Marco Garcia/Associated Press)

‘Pearl Harbor syndrome’

Abe’s visit is not without political risk given the Japanese people’s long, emotional reckoning with their nation’s aggression in the war. Though the history books have largely deemed Pearl Harbor a surprise attack, Japan’s government insisted as recently as this month that it had intended to give the U.S. prior notice that it was declaring war and failed only because of “bureaucratic bungling.”

“There’s this sense of guilt, if you like, among Japanese, this ‘Pearl Harbor syndrome,’ that we did something very unfair,” said Tamaki Tsukada, a minister in the Embassy of Japan in Washington. “I think the prime minister’s visit will in a sense absolve that kind of complex that Japanese people have.”

75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor attack1:51

Since the war, the U.S. and Japan have built a powerful alliance that both sides say has grown during Obama’s tenure, including strengthened military ties. Both Obama and Abe were driving forces behind the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a sweeping free trade deal now on hold due to staunch opposition by Congress and U.S. president-elect Donald Trump.

Moving beyond the painful legacy of the war has been easier for Japan and the U.S. than for Japan and its other former foes, such as South Korea and China. As Abe arrived in Hawaii, Beijing dismissed as “wishful thinking” the notion that Japan could “liquidate the history of World War II” by visiting Pearl Harbor.

“Japan can never turn this page over without reconciliation from China and other victimized countries in Asia,” said Hua Chunying, a Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman.

As Obama’s presidency ends, there are questions about how U.S.-Japan ties will fare under Trump.

During the campaign, Trump suggested that Japan and South Korea should obtain nuclear weapons so the U.S. would no longer be burdened with the costs of defending them, a disquieting notion in many Asian capitals. But after Trump’s election, Abe became the first foreign leader to meet with him, sitting down in Trump Tower with the business mogul and Trump’s daughter, Ivanka.

Though no Japanese prime minister has visited the USS Arizona Memorial, former Japanese leader Shigeru Yoshida visited Pearl Harbor in 1951, six years after Japan surrendered. He stopped there on his way home from signing the San Francisco peace treaty with the U.S. and others, and paid a courtesy visit to the office of Adm. Arthur W.R. Radford.

Other prime ministers have since visited Pearl Harbor and the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, known as Punchbowl.

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CBC | World News

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